You have an outdated browser

Please update your browser

Update browser
Show news archive News & Seafood Insight

Welcome aboard Akamalik

22.12.2016

Akamalik is Royal Greenland's largest prawn trawler, catching and producing shell-on prawns in the pristine waters of the North Atlantic. Captain Jogvan Trondarson welcomes you onboard for an exclusive look inside the impressive vessel in this 360° film.

Explore catch and the onboard factory using your mouse or watch it on your smartphone and turn your device or swipe to get the full experience.

Akamalik is a so called seagoing factory trawler fishing far from shore in deep waters and boiling, packing and freezing the prawns onboard within 3 hours after catch. To reach distant fishing grounds far from land, the seagoing vessels are at sea for several weeks at a time, until the cargo hold is full. While at sea, the vessel is constantly fishing, and two full crews operate shifts around the clock. Each shift is normally 6-8 hours at a time and the full crew is around 25 people.

Frozen at sea shell-on prawns are either shipped directly from the catching vessel to customers around the world or to Royal Greenland's factories ashore for peeling and/or repackaging.

Juicy, flavourful prawns

Choosing shell-on prawns has several culinary advantages – first and foremost, they are frozen straight after catch and are thus very fresh and the quality is straight-from-the-sea. In addition, the shell helps preserve flavour, texture and colour – a shell-on prawn will often be firmer and have more intense colour than a mechanically peeled prawn. Peeling by hand might seem as quite a job, but it is rewarded with excellent prawns, perfect for those special occasions. The shells are great for cooking prawn bisque or stock for sauces etc.

Akamalik facts

Akamalik facts

• Captain: Jogvan Trondarson/Linjohn Christiansen<br> • Length/Width: 75.8 x 14.5<br> • Production capacity: 110 t/day<br> • Catch capacity: 7-10,000 t/year<br> • Cargo hold capacity: 450-750 t<br> • Crew: 22-26<br>
Next news: A year in the North Atlantic
...